Latest News

CCG awarded funding for Mental Health Support in North Yorkshire schools

CCG awarded funding for Mental Health Support in North Yorkshire schools

NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group has been awarded funding from NHS England to train and develop a Mental Health Support Team for young people in Selby and Pickering.

The Mental Health Support Team will work across schools, colleges and sixth forms in Selby and Pickering to engage with 16-19 year olds vulnerable to mental health issues – which could be related to the pressures of exams, job seeking or relationships. 

NHS England report that up to 20% of 15-19 year olds are predicted to have a mild to moderate mental health disorder such as anxiety or low mood. The NHS Long Term Plan has a focus on improving mental health services for young people and their access to support.

Denise Nightingale, the CCG’s Executive Director of Transformation, Complex Care and Mental Health said: “Children’s mental health is a local and national priority and so the CCG is delighted we can offer support through school based intervention in Selby and Pickering.

“There hasn’t been a service like this in Selby or Pickering before and it’s important to us that we are breaking down barriers when it comes to accessing mental health support.”

The lead provider for the new service is Tees Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust (TEWV) who are commissioned by the CGG to deliver Mental Health services in the Vale of York.

Naomi Lonergan, Director of Operations for TEWV North Yorkshire and York said: “We are delighted to work alongside our colleagues at NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group to provide targeted mental health support directly into local schools.  This new project will provide us with greater opportunities to provide effective, early support to those experiencing difficulties, helping to improve mental health and educational outcomes for young people and their families in the area.”

NHS England is funding 14 Mental Health Support Teams across the North of England to improve access to mental health services for young people. North Yorkshire will house two within the county with one team covering Selby and Pickering and the other Scarborough.

Angela Crossland, Head of Community, Partnerships and Customers at Selby Town Council and Kathryn Ingold, Public Health Consultant, from North Yorkshire County Council have been working together to improve population health across Selby District and commented:  “Engagement undertaken by a Selby Health Matters partnership found that issues of mental health and social isolation are priority areas requiring focus in the patch.  We welcome investment from NHS England to support young people in Selby and Pickering.”

The Mental Health Support Teams will be made up of four educational mental health workers who will complete a one year Children’s Psychology Work Practitioner (CPWP) course, with additional modules for work in an education setting. This recruit to train model means delivery in schools will commence in autumn 2020.

York Patients provide positive feedback for Integrated Care

Patients in York are benefitting from a central point of access to health and social care services delivered by The York Integrated Care Team (YICT) thanks to joined up services and the delivery of comprehensive care packages.

YICT is a multidisciplinary team working with eleven GP practices to support the population of York. Their main aim is to help keep people out of hospital and independent which has proved very successful by working directly with each individual patient to see if alternative solutions can be found.

In feedback about the care they received from the team, one patient said: “The knowledge that someone will be paying a visit to see if help is needed with an everyday task like washing, dressing, preparation of a meal, help with medication and a chat alone makes this day seem brighter, particularly if you live alone and do not get out due to a variety of reasons (age being one reason, mobility etc)”

Another patient said: “I was impressed by the joined up service from A&E onwards. The whole visit was done at my pace. No pressures”

The scheme covers all City of York practices totalling 207,000 patients and work is continuing with partners across the Vale of York to expand the service further.

Dr Nigel Wells, a local GP and the Clinical Chair at NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group said: “The team’s work has delivered some very positive outcomes and good levels of satisfaction for local patients for its innovative approach to ensuring that local patients receive the right care, in the right place, at the right time. The team thoroughly deserves to be recognised for its high praise.

Lesley Godfrey, Clinical Lead for YICT and Partner at Priory Medical Group said: “The York Integrated Care Team is delighted with the positive feedback we have received especially as we have just celebrated our 5th year of service. We aim to provide a seamless integrated approach to care and have made a person centred approach a core value of the team. We work widely with the third sector as well as health and social care teams to enable people to make their own choices and maintain independence.”

For more information please visit: https://www.valeofyorkccg.nhs.uk/our-work/york-integrated-care-team/

Breakthrough technology for people with diabetes available in York

NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning group has adopted the NHS England commissioning position on FreeStyle Libre to allow people with Type 1 diabetes to self-manage glucose levels.

FreeStyle Libre is a handheld device which scans over a sensor applied to the skin to measure interstitial glucose levels – an alternative to routine finger-prick blood glucose testing. This results in a quick and painless glucose reading, a near-continuous record of measurement and an indication of level trends over time. 

Dr Andrew Lee, the CCG’s Executive Director of Primary Care and Population Health said: “The CCG are delighted to be able to offer FreeStyle Libre in the Vale of York. Over 1600 members of our population live with type 1 diabetes and this new technology offers a chance to revolutionise diabetes self-management and give people even more control over their health.

“Being able to monitor glucose readings digitally and access recordings on demand is an example of the brilliant digital resources we have in the NHS.”

Eligible people will be initiated on to FreeStyle Libre through the Diabetes Specialist Team at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Local GPs will then issue their patients with a prescription for two Freestyle Libre sensors per month until a six month re-assessment.

Tara Kadis, Lead Diabetes Nurse, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust said: “To evidence the impact of FreeStyle Libre and ensure usage is improving diabetes self-management, Vale of York patients must be provided with; education on Flash Glucose Monitoring, agree to regular reviews with the clinician team and agree to scan their glucose levels at least 8 times a day per day.

“People with type 1 diabetes who are interested in FreeStyle Libre can speak to their GP to check for eligibility and referrals to the York Diabetes Specialist Team.”

Current evidence suggests that users of FreeStyle Libre may reduce the number of hypoglycaemic events (when blood sugar levels are too low) per day by over 25%. Device accuracy and clinical acceptability also proved better than finger prick testing.

For more information on FreeStyle Libre and a full list of eligibility criteria please visit: https://www.valeofyorkccg.nhs.uk/rss/data/uploads/diabetes/final-fsl-commissioning-position-april-2019_v3.pdf

 

Local health chiefs create opportunities for primary care learning and development

NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group is working with Hull and York Medical School’s Academy of Primary Care and a range of other training sources to provide professional learning and development opportunities for primary care based staff. The training opportunity, which takes place four times a year and shaped to the needs of primary care clinicians, takes place on Wednesday 3 July 2019.

The event is delivered in partnership with NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group and the Academy of Primary Care, part of the Hull and York Medical School.

Dr Nigel Wells, Clinical Chair at the CCG said: “The Vale of York area is fortunate to have high quality primary care services, but we are now experiencing challenges in the recruitment of new staff, the retention of experienced colleagues and an ever-increasing work load.

“Peer-led development of local GPs and primary care staff has been made possible thanks to some important investment into primary care services by the CCG because we want to see primary care at the centre of service delivery.

Dr Wells added: “The protected learning time we have developed for our member practices will help towards providing a firm foundation for us to deliver care that meets the population’s changing needs and allow for a renewed focus on improving health, over treating disease.”

Dr Warren Larkin, a renowned Consultant Clinical Psychologist, will be delivering the opening presentation on Addressing Childhood Adversity in Professional Practice. The workshop sessions will give participants to add to their learning. The sessions include back pain management and analgesia, building a suicide safer community, digital engagement, fertility, colorectal and anaemia pathways, liver function and biochemistry tests, prescribing, paediatrics, safeguarding and wound care.

Siân Balsom at Healthwatch York said: “Protected Learning Time is a really useful opportunity for GPs across the Vale of York to get together and share best practice, enabling them to keep providing high quality support for local patients.

“It’s vital that we all know how to access care during these times and we welcome the CCG’s work to spread the word so everyone knows how what to do if they need medical assistance during these times.”

To ensure that patients continue to receive the care they need from their local GP practice, the local Out of Hours GP provider, Vocare will be supplying clinical cover from 12 midday to 6pm to those practices that choose to take up the learning and development opportunity.

Breastfeeding celebration week 2019 – Where to find support in York

Local health commissioners recently supported the national Breastfeeding Celebration Week to promote the benefits of breastfeeding and skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby.

Breastfeeding is a skill that can take time to get the hang of and some women can experience breastfeeding difficulties. In York there are support groups available for new mums who may be worrying about breastfeeding or lacking in confidence:

  1. Nurture Breastfeeding Group

Offers antenatal and postnatal women the opportunity to meet in an informal, social setting to discuss breastfeeding, ask questions and receive advice. There are two weekly sessions on Tuesdays 10am – 12pm and Thursdays 1pm-2:30pm. For more information contact 01904 555475 or 551760.

  1. Treasure Chest Breastfeeding Peer Support

Operating weekly drop in’s, antenatal workshops, hire pumps and support online, Treasure Chest operates with volunteers who give up their free time to support breastfeeding mums. Visit the website for more details http://www.treasurechest.org.uk/

Emily Pickard, Chair of the York and District Maternity Voices Partnership said: “Feeding can be really hard at first – people don’t always tell you that before you have a baby – so it can come as a shock and leave you feeling like a failure if it doesn’t come ‘naturally’. I’ve found that many parents struggle with this initially which is why support groups are so brilliant.

“We’re very fortunate in York to have so many supportive services available where parents can receive a friendly welcome, reassurance and the advice they need. I went along to Treasure Chest with my first daughter and they were brilliant.”

Midwives, heath visitors or a local breastfeeding support group can answer any questions people may have about breastfeeding.

Fiona Phillips, Assistant Director of Public Health for City of York, said: ‘It is not uncommon for mums to experience challenges with breastfeeding. These problems can often be unanticipated, meaning that when they occur mums can tend to give up and instead switch to formula feeding. We would encourage all mums to seek support when these challenges arise, as solutions are often found.’

For more information about breastfeeding visit the Start 4 Life website: https://www.nhs.uk/start4life/baby/breastfeeding/extra-help-and-support/

Nursing Times award in sight for CCG’s ‘React to Red’ pressure ulcer prevention work

An initiative by Vale of York NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) which reduced pressure ulcers in care homes by 75% has been shortlisted for a Nursing Times Award.

‘React to Red’ is an NHS campaign which aims to educate people on pressure ulcer prevention and the simple steps that can be taken to avoid them. By adapting this national approach, the CCG has been shortlisted in the Care of Older People category thanks to an intensive face-to-face training programme within primary care settings which has improved quality life for elderly patients.

1736 eligible staff from care homes, Learning Disability/Mental Health providers, day care facilities, extra care housing facilities and respite providers engaged with the CCG are using new knowledge and skills to effectively manage pressure area care, promote skin integrity, recognise early signs of damage and prevent deterioration.

Michelle Carrington, the CCG’s Executive Director of Quality and Nursing said: “Residents in care homes often have complex care needs, are increasingly frail and are therefore at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. Although largely preventable, when pressure ulcers do occur the impact on the lives of our most vulnerable is significant with implications such as pain, reduced mobility, social isolation and increased support from health and care services.

“To be recognised by the Nursing Times Awards is an excellent achievement and brilliant news for the dedicated team who delivered the React to Red approach across the Vale of York. We could not have achieved this without the unwavering determination of the care home staff to keep their residents safe from harm.”

In September the CCG’s Quality and Nursing project team will travel to London and present the React to Red programme to a panel of Nursing Times judges. Winners will be announced in an award ceremony held on 31 October 2019.

All shortlisted entries are listed on the Nursing Times Awards website: https://awards.nursingtimes.net/2019-shortlist

More information about the React to Red programme can be found on the CCG's webpage.

 

Nursing Times award in sight for CCG’s ‘React to Red’ pressure ulcer prevention work

An initiative by Vale of York NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) which reduced pressure ulcers in care homes by 75% has been shortlisted for a Nursing Times Award.

‘React to Red’ is an NHS campaign which aims to educate people on pressure ulcer prevention and the simple steps that can be taken to avoid them. By adapting this national approach, the CCG has been shortlisted in the Care of Older People category thanks to an intensive face-to-face training programme within primary care settings which has improved quality life for elderly patients.

1736 eligible staff from care homes, Learning Disability/Mental Health providers, day care facilities, extra care housing facilities and respite providers engaged with the CCG are using new knowledge and skills to effectively manage pressure area care, promote skin integrity, recognise early signs of damage and prevent deterioration.

Michelle Carrington, the CCG’s Executive Director of Quality and Nursing said: “Residents in care homes often have complex care needs, are increasingly frail and are therefore at high risk of developing pressure ulcers. Although largely preventable, when pressure ulcers do occur the impact on the lives of our most vulnerable is significant with implications such as pain, reduced mobility, social isolation and increased support from health and care services.

“To be recognised by the Nursing Times Awards is an excellent achievement and brilliant news for the dedicated team who delivered the React to Red approach across the Vale of York. We could not have achieved this without the unwavering determination of the care home staff to keep their residents safe from harm.”

In September the CCG’s Quality and Nursing project team will travel to London and present the React to Red programme to a panel of Nursing Times judges. Winners will be announced in an award ceremony held on 31 October 2019.

All shortlisted entries are listed on the Nursing Times Awards website: https://awards.nursingtimes.net/2019-shortlist

More information about the React to Red programme can be found on the CCG's webpage.

 

People in York more engaged with diabetes services

The Vale of York NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has reduced the number of people at risk of serious diabetes complications thanks to a collaborative effort to improve diabetes support services.

The Diabetes Specialist Outreach Team (DSOT) was initiated in October 2017 with York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (YTHFT) and engages with people struggling to manage their diabetes. The proactive, targeted approach through primary and secondary care has resulted in 36% and 58% respectively of this specific patient group reducing their HbA1c (average blood sugar level) which represents a significant decrease in risk of all diabetes-related complications.

People with diabetes can be at risk of emergency hospital admission due to high blood sugar levels. The specialised care provided by the DSOT supports their specific needs in order to better understand and treat their condition leading to a healthier life and fewer admissions. This includes reengagement with their GP practice and better management of diabetes long-term.

Dr Sarah Eaton, a Vale of York GP with diabetes specialist interest said: “This innovative project has shown that a specialist team can support this specific group and enable them to improve their health. For example, there was a 45% improvement for people in this group achieving their targets for BP, HbA1c and cholesterol. This has led to a reduced risk of complications and hospital admissions as well as better engagement with health professionals.”

Preventing diabetes is a local priority and since August 2018 there have been 1123 people from the Vale of York referred onto the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme. This is a targeted programme for those at risk of developing diabetes which aims to influence behavioural changes to better health.

Dr Nigel Wells, a local GP and the CCG’s Clinical Chair said: “People with diabetes can live a healthy life when they have the right knowledge, support and care to safely manage the condition. I am really happy that joined up working has accelerated local improvement work in diabetes services and enabled the Diabetes Specialist Outreach Team to identify patients more quickly, enabling an improved experience for patients and their health outcomes.”

For further information and support on diabetes please visit: www.yourdiabetes.org.uk